Psychology

PSYC E-15 Introduction to Psychology
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375.

Fall term (10232): L. Dodge Fernald, PhD, Senior Lecturer on Psychology, Harvard University. Monday, Sept. 16, 5:30-7:30 pm, Harvard Hall 104.

Spring term (20205): Annick F. Mansfield, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology, Wellesley College. Monday, Jan. 27, 5:30-7:30 pm, Harvard Hall 104.

This survey shows how psychologists study human behavior, experience, and mental processes, illustrating the methods, findings, and systems of modern psychology. Topics of interest include the heredity-environment issue, influences of conditioning, principles of memory, the question of paranormal events, unconscious motivation, and approaches to therapy.

PSYC E-1030 Human Development (21109)
Rebecca Hencke, PhD, Instructor in Psychology, Wheelock College.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Wednesday, Jan. 29, 7:35-9:35 pm, William James Hall 1. Spring term

This course introduces the major theories of human development and what they propose about the relative roles of nature and nurture. Major topics include biological, cognitive, and social development from infancy through adolescence, with a focus on cognitive development in infancy and preschool. Prerequisite: introductory psychology.

PSYC E-1040 Introduction to Personality Psychology (11197)
Eileen Donahue, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Wellesley College.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Monday, Sept. 16, 7:35-9:35 pm, William James Hall 1. Fall term

This course will consider classic theories of personality and recent developments in our scientific understanding of individual differences. The theories will include psychodynamic, life-span, trait, and humanistic approaches, providing conceptual frameworks for studying the person. The focus on recent developments will examine empirical research in specific current issues. The basic theme is continuity and change across the lifespan.

PSYC E-1055 The Psychology of Nonverbal Communication (11231)
Marvin A. Hecht, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology, Harvard University.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Wednesday, Sept. 18, 7:35-9:35 pm, William James Hall 1. Fall term

This course covers nonverbal communication from a social psychological perspective. Research on facial expression, gaze, posture, touch, and other nonverbal channels will be presented, with particular application to intimate relationships, hierarchical relations, and deception situations. The course also will focus on the link to other theories within psychology. Prerequisite: introductory psychology.

PSYC E-1060 Human Emotion (21065)
Matthew Leeds, PhD, Instructor in Psychology, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7:35-9:35 pm, Sever Hall 103. Spring term

Emotion is a fundamental, complex, and sometimes confusing part of human experience. This course will survey the current state of knowledge about human emotion and address a series of questions. What is emotion? Do we find a set of universal basic emotions if we look across cultures? What are the functions of emotion? Can we control our emotions? Is cognition required for emotion to be activated? Prerequisite: introductory psychology.

PSYC E-1188 Caring for Children: History, Theory, and Practice (20207)
Karen L. Olson, PhD, Instructor in Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Wednesday, Jan. 29, 5:30-7:30 pm, Sever Hall 214. Spring term

Current, historical, theoretical, and cross-cultural ideas about child care. Defined broadly, child care refers to both care within the family and care by society. Topics include advice to parents (particularly regarding discipline), temperament, day care, family forms, the effects of poverty on children, and social policy.

PSYC E-1240 Abnormal Psychology and Adaptation (10236)
Charles P. Ducey, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Tuesday, Sept. 17, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 1. Fall term

Psychopathology is an attempt at adaptation to intolerable external or internal conditions. It may manifest itself as developmental arrest, compromise, or regression in the face of internal or external demands for maturation. This course offers an integrated model of psychopathology based upon these premises. It provides a general overview of the diagnostic classification, etiology, and prognosis of the major syndromes. The course will use developmental theory, clinical illustrations, and longitudinal empirical research as the basis for understanding the causes of psychopathology. Genetic, early environmental, and developmental influences on psychopathology will be disentangled from one another. Prerequisite: introductory course in psychology and some familiarity with personality or developmental theory.

PSYC E-1293/W The Aging Process (10728)
Douglas H. Powell, EdD, Psychologist to University Health Services, Harvard University.
    Writing-intensive course. 4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Thursday, Sept. 19, 5:30-7:30 pm, Harvard Hall 102. Fall term

This course will focus on the human aging process. Aging will be studied from four perspectives: physical, cognitive, social, and psychological. Recent research on optimizing the aging process will be reviewed.

PSYC E-1410 Psychopharmacology of Drug and Alcohol Abuse (11192)
Scott E. Lukas, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Pharmacology), Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Monday, Sept. 16, 7:35-9:35 pm, William James Hall 105. Fall term

This course presents basic information on how alcohol and various drugs of abuse affect the brain. Different drug classes will be discussed each week, with an emphasis on use profiles, mechanism of action, identification of users, and current treatments. Controversy on legalization, needle exchange, AIDS, urine testing, and use by athletes also will be addressed. The course is designed for both the lay public and health professionals. Prerequisite: BIOL E-176a is helpful but not required.

PSYC E-1450 The Biopsychology of Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming (20517)
J. Allan Hobson, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Monday, Jan. 27, 7:35-9:35 pm, Harvard Hall 201. Spring term

Consciousness undergoes dramatic alterations as the brain changes state every day of our lives. The goal of this course is to examine these brain-mind correlations from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. The historical development of psychology (especially psychoanalysis), philosophy of mind, and neurophysiology will be reviewed as they bear on the theory of dreams. The clinical implications of sleep science will be examined in two ways: dreaming as a model psychosis, and the pathophysiology of sleep disorders. Students will collect and analyze subjective data from their own conscious experience. Prerequisite: some background in psychology and neurobiology is helpful but is not assumed.

PSYC E-1500 Psychology of Written Language (21006)
Alfonso Caramazza, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Wednesday, Jan. 29, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 105. Spring term

A survey of the cognitive, neuropsychological, developmental, linguistic/historical, and computational perspectives of the ability to acquire and use written language. Topics include the relation between written and spoken language, developmental and acquired disorders of reading and writing, computational models of reading and writing, the interplay of linguistic, perceptual, and cognitive factors in the ability to read and write.

PSYC E-1510 Disorders of Language (11105)
Alfonso Caramazza, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University.
    Graduate seminar. 4 units. Graduate credit $1,115. Limited enrollment. Wednesday, Sept. 18, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 4. Fall term

An examination of the patterns of language impairment that result from brain damage. The course focuses on the implications of the various forms of language disorders for theories of language processing. Topics covered include disorders of sentence comprehension and production, acquired dyslexia and dysgraphia, anomia, disorders of speech perception and production, and the role of disorders of working memory, perception, and attention on language processing. Prerequisite: introductory psychology, linguistics, or permission of instructor.

PSYC E-1551 Themes and Controversies in Social Cognition (21147)
Daniel Gilbert, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University.
    Graduate seminar. 4 units. Graduate credit $1,115. Limited enrollment. Monday, Jan. 27, 5:30 pm, William James Hall 374. Spring term

This seminar will explore the scientific literature on cognitive process in social psychology. Topics will include idealism versus realism, intransigence versus credulity, rationality versus irrationality, situationism versus dispositionism, stereotyping versus individualism, and self-knowledge versus self-deception. Prerequisites: A previous course in social or cognitive psychology is very helpful, the ability to read primary source material in psychology is necessary.

PSYC E-1604 Neuropsychology (10729)
Mark S. Greenberg, PhD, Instructor in Psychology, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $445, graduate credit $1,095. Thursday, Sept. 19, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 1. Fall term

An introduction to neuropsychology, intended for interested laypeople and human service professionals. After a review of basic neurology, neuroanatomy, and principles of brain organization, we will examine representative neurologic syndromes: Alzheimer's disease, the aphasias, the frontal-lobe personality, hemi-inattention, temporal-lobe epilepsy, and learning disabilities. Prerequisite: introductory psychology, prior course work in physiological psychology, or permission of instructor.

PSYC E-1653 Issues in Developmental Psychology (11172)
Michelle D. Leichtman, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard University.
    Graduate seminar. 4 units. Graduate credit $1,115. Limited enrollment. Tuesday, Sept. 17, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 374. Fall term

This seminar treats selected topics in social, cognitive, and emotional development across the lifecourse. Theoretical and applied issues will be studied (for example: attachment, emotion, and thinking; schooling and intelligence). Special emphasis will be given to early childhood. Assumes basic knowledge of development. Well-suited for those with interest in or experience with children. Prerequisite: course in psychology.

PSYC E-1870 Law and Psychology (20212)
Ellsworth Lapham Fersch, PhD, JD, Lecturer on Psychology, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Monday, Jan. 27, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 1. Spring term

This course compares legal and psychological approaches to human behavior and considers their interaction. It emphasizes the roles of lawyers and of psychologists and psychiatrists in theory and in practice. Topics include divorce and custody, involuntary commitment to mental hospitals and substance abuse programs, punishment and rehabilitation, the insanity defense, and crimes without victims.

PSYC E-1880 Clinical Psychology (10241)
Nancy Hebben, PhD, Clinical Instructor in Neuropsychology, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Thursday, Sept. 19, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 105. Fall term

An overview of the field of clinical psychology, focusing on theory, research, and practice. Major topics will be historical background, training, personality theory, diagnosis according to DSM-IV, assessment, psychotherapy, and ethics and professional issues. Prerequisite: course work in psychology, preferably abnormal psychology or personality theory.

PSYC E-2000/W Case Studies in Adult Life (11045)
Wynn Schwartz, PhD, Clinical Instructor in Psychology, Harvard Medical School.
    Writing-intensive course. 4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Tuesday, Sept. 17, 7:35-9:35 pm, William James Hall 105. Fall term

Employing both a descriptive and psychodynamic perspective, we will examine individual lives. First-person accounts and material from long-term psychotherapy will serve as primary texts. Participants will be expected to construct a psychological biography and to become familiar with personality description and interviewing techniques. Prerequisite: introductory psychology course.

PSYC E-2150 Memory Development (21067) - CANCELLED

Students should call (617) 495-4024 for information on new spring-term seminars in psychology.

PSYC E-2465 Psychological Measurement and Evaluation (21068)
Daniel Perschonok, PhD, Lecturer on Psychology, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Wednesday, Jan. 29, 7:35-9:35 pm, William James Hall 6. Spring term

This course examines the goals and methods of psychological assessment of different aspects of human functioning with the emphasis on measurement of intelligence. Reviews the rationale of different approaches to assessment, the construction of tests, and controversies over the value and use of tests. Students will explore these issues through the study of case material and the interpretation of intelligence test protocols of different individuals, and some in-class exercises in administration. Prerequisites: SSCI E-105, PSYC E-1040, or PSYC E-1240.

PSYC E-2488 Theories of Psychotherapy (20213)
Charles P. Ducey, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School.
    4 units. Noncredit $240, undergraduate credit $375, graduate credit $1,025. Tuesday, Jan. 28, 5:30-7:30 pm, William James Hall 1. Spring term

Psychotherapy encompasses similar techniques for the alleviation of human suffering the world over. We shall examine these universal techniques and then the major schools of Western psychotherapy for their different models of personality development, etiology of psychopathology, and conception of cure. We shall focus upon modern therapeutic techniques, the therapist-patient relationship, psychological studies of interpersonal influence, current research findings on psychotherapy outcome, and ethical issues. Prerequisites: introductory course in psychology and at least one course in personality theory, developmental theory, or psychopathology.

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